‘First run’ tag for green power-adopting thermal power plant: CSE

‘First run’ tag for green power-adopting thermal power plant: CSE

BATHINDA: The Center for Science and Environment (CSE) has focused on calling those plants as ‘first run’ plants, with the aim of encouraging coal-fired thermal power plants adopting green norms for clean air.
These plants will require a certificate from the Pollution Control Board to certify that they are compliant or suitably advanced to comply with the December 2015 environmental norms, primarily PM, SO2 and NO2K In emission. A ranking of first-run power stations will have to be made and priority will have to be purchased from them.
CSE has also urged to increase penalties for power plants that are not showing any interest in adopting such norms to reduce emissions.
CSE on Wednesday released a report in a webinar about the thermal power plant that is likely to miss the green standard deadline of 2022, which is undergoing progress so far. Chairman, Economic Advisory Council to Prime Minister, Bibek Debroy, Power Secretary Sanjeev Nandan Sahay, NTPC CMD Gurdeep Singh, Adani Transmission MD and CEO Anil Sardana attended the webinar and kept the Government’s point of view.
“CSE has classified power generation as per the Flue Gas Desalination (FGD) norms. Accordingly it is expected to meet the target of 57624 MW coal, which is in the yellow category, likely to miss the target of 140940 MW and It is placed in the orange category, the target of 7450 MW is set to be missed and it has been put in the red category ”, CSE DG Sunita Narayan.
As per the current rules, the current penalty of Rs 30,000-50,000 per MW for not complying is not sufficient to serve any purpose. To deal with this, the CPCB will need to phase out and amend the penal provisions. KV Yadav, Program Director of Industrial Pollution CSE, Envit, said that CSE suggested a penalty of Rs 20 lakh per MW.
Coal-fired electricity is one of the most resource-intensive and polluting industries and coal power plants account for 60% of total particulate matter, 45% of total sulfur dioxide, 30% of total nitrogen oxides, and more than 80 percent of total mercury emissions We do. Emitted by all industries in India.
To prevent pollution caused by coal-fired power plants, the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) introduced strict environmental standards for coal-based plants on December 7, 2015 under the Environmental Protection Act, 1986. All thermal plants were required to comply with revised standards by December 2017, but the deadline was pushed to 2022.
CSE analysis shows that even five years after the declaration of these criteria, most plants have not taken adequate action and have not yet made significant progress and are going through progress, limiting this timeframe to an installed capacity of 2. Cannot be completed by 70 percent, 06,014 MW. It seems that 30 percent capacity is still trying to meet the criteria. Apart from 2.06 lakh MW, the installed capacity of renewable power stations in the country is 86,400 MW.

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