Researchers show how the body’s own immune system can kill cancer

Researchers show how the body’s own immune system can kill cancer

WASHINGTON: A new way to help the body’s immune system fight off cancer has been discovered by a University of Missouri researcher.
“Normally, your body’s immune cells are on patrol to identify and eliminate foreign bodies in the body,” said Yves Chabo, an assistant professor at the Division of Biological Sciences.
“Normal cells carry the ‘do-out-come’ molecular flag, identified by immune cells, which causes the destruction of normal tissues. But some cancers have the ability to mimic normal cells and make this ‘dawn’.” As a result, the immune system fails to recognize cancer as a defective tissue and leaves it alone, which is bad news for the patient, Chago added.
Immunotherapy is cancer drugs that primarily block the “do out me” signal from cancer and allow the immune system to collapse.
Chabo, who is assigned to the College of Arts and Sciences, said that while these immunotherapy works for certain types of cancer, prostate cancer is highly immune, meaning that the physical and molecular environment of the cancer is only the body’s strength. Dominate the immune system.
But Chabo has opened up a solution with the help of more than 50-year-old bacterial strains.
“Cancers vary from one person to another, even when they affect the same tissue. These differences play an important role in whether a particular therapy will effectively kill the cancer. And the patient can be helped. The bacteria themselves are genetically flexible, so it can be genetically modified to overcome patients’ treatment limitations, Chabo said.
“Imagine a patient whose cancer is not responding to conventional treatment and who has no other option for treatment.
In a previous study, scientists at the Cancer Research Center and the University of Missouri developed a genetically isolated and non-toxic strain of Salmonella called CRC2631 to select and eliminate cancer cells.
CRC2631 is derived from another strain of Salmonella that has been stored at room temperature for more than half a century. Now, scientists like Chabo are demonstrating the potential of CRC2631, which enthusiastically targets cancerous tumors, to be used to keep the body’s immune system against prostate cancer.
“Because CRC2631 primarily uses tumor cells, its effect is primarily on the tumor. The use of CRC2631 in health-related medicine to rejuvenate the treatment according to the patient is possible. Predicts, or offers the ability to adapt to a specific patient. ” .
Highlighting the promise of health-related health care and the impact of large-scale interdisciplinary collaboration, the University of Missouri System’s Nextgen Precision Health Initiative is part of the system’s four research universities on life-changing health-related health advances. Gathering innovators.
It is a collaborative effort to draw the strengths of Missouri and the entire UM system toward a better future for Missouri health. A key part of the initiative is the construction of the new NextGen Precision Health Building, which will enhance collaboration between researchers, medical experts and industry leaders in a state-of-the-art research facility.

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