Scientists decode how coronaviruses interact with proteins in human cells

Scientists decode how coronaviruses interact with proteins in human cells

BOSTON: Scientists have unveiled the first Atlas Charter showing how the genetic material of the novel coronavirus interacts with proteins in human cells, a breakthrough pointing to the development of a new treatment against code 19. Can provide a start.
According to researchers, one of the most important tasks, including those from the Broad Institute in the United States, is to understand the entire ethical interaction between the virus and the cells affected by it.
He explained that a detailed understanding of these interactions would help identify the processes in host cells that favor the multiplication of viruses, and those that activate the host’s defense system.
Although the SARS-CO2 virus uses host proteins to replicate, scientists say that so far, there is no detailed understanding of all the proteins found in human cells that contain viral genetic material. Interacts with KRNA.
In a recent study published in the journal Nature Microbiology, scientists created the first global atlas of direct interaction between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and proteins in human cells.
Based on the results, the researchers also identified key regulators of viral copying.
Scientists infected human cells with novel coronaviruses, purified viral RNA and identified its bound proteins.
“In this particular case, we are conducting quantitative measurements to identify the strongest binding partners,” said Matthias Manshauer, co-author of the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-Based Infection Research (HIRI) study in Germany. Succeeded.
Scientists say the RNA-protein interaction atlas offers unique insights into co-infection, which could lead to systematic breakdown of factors affecting virus replication and host defense strategies. ۔
From the results, the scientists identified 18 host proteins that play a key role in SARS Cowboy 2 infection, and found 20 smaller molecules that can block these proteins.
He believes that the two proteins CNBP and LARP1 are particularly interesting.
The researchers also identified target sites in these proteins that could be used to inhibit virus replication.
According to Manshauer, the characteristic of LARP1 as an antiviral factor is an important finding.
He added, “The way LARP1 binds to wireless RNA is very interesting, because it’s very similar to how LARP1 regulates some cellular messenger RNA that we already know. It provides insight into possible methods. ”
According to scientists, three of the four small molecules they tested prevent viral replication in different types of human cells. This suggests that new therapies for Covid-19 may open up.

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