Scientists have studied the spread of cancer cells in detail

Scientists have studied the spread of cancer cells in detail

TOKYO: With the help of a mouse model, scientists at Kanazawa University have conducted a detailed study of how cells help the body excrete and spread cancer.
Most tumors consist of different compounds of cells. Genetic mutations in some of these cells contribute to the spread and growth of cancer. However, oncologists often find that when tumors metastasize to distant organs, they retain this contrasting nature – a phenomenon called “polyclonal metastasis”.
That mechanism of non-metastatic cells with metastatic cells is ambiguous. Now, Masanobu Oshima and his research team have used the mouse model to explain how non-metastatic cells begin their long journey.
The team has previously developed and closely analyzed mutations related to different types of cancer in mice to determine which cancer cells are inherited and which are not. It was found that the cells with four mutations, colloquially called AKTP, were the most deadly. When these cells were transplanted into the mucous membranes of mice, they migrated and formed colonies in living organisms within 3 days.
In contrast, the cells of the two mutations, AK and AP, could not cross this distance. To replicate the polyclonal metastasis, the AP cell was co-transplanted with the APT cells, and both cells were actually transplanted into the living. Instead, when AP cells were injected into the blood (without prior exposure to AKTP cells), they could not metastasize. It was as if some processes were taking place when the cells were being pulled together.
Next, the AKTP cells inside the liver tumor were killed to determine how closely it affected the AP cells. AP cells continue to grow and grow into larger tumors, suggesting that they no longer need AKTP cells. Thus, at some point in the journey from the spleen to the liver, the AP cells become dangerous.
To illustrate this point, the researchers traced the origins of the events. Within a day of transplantation, AKTP clusters were found in the sinusoidal vessel, a large blood vessel supplying the liver. For 14 days, this redness. Was renamed “Fibrotic Niche” on a large scale. A mixture of AP and AKTP cells was observed on the same scale, but not only with AP cells.
And what’s more, this massive AKTP cell was activating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). HSCs are responsible for scarring of liver tissue. Activated HSCs then create the best environment for unlimited proliferation of AP cells. Harping AP cells in a fibrous environment was, therefore, an important step.
The researchers concluded that “these results indicate that non-metastatic cells can metastasize using malignant cells using the fibrotic niche through the method of polyclonal metastasis.” Targeting this fibrotic site can be a promising strategy for maintaining the spread of solid tumors.

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