Scientists return from the Arctic with a wealth of climate data

Scientists return from the Arctic with a wealth of climate data

Berlin: An icebreaker carrying scientists on a one-year international effort to study the high Arctic is back at its home port in Germany carrying a treasure trove of data that will help researchers explore climate change in the coming decades Will help to predict better.
RV Polarstern arrived in Bremerhaven’s North Sea harbor on Monday, from where they prepared for more than a year ago for the grueling cold and polar bear encounters – but not for the pandemic lockdown that nearly shattered halfway through the mission Had happened.
“We basically got everything we were told by satellite phone to the Associated Press last week after being released from the Polar Circle,” said campaign leader Marcus Rex. “We conducted the measurements for an entire year with just a short break.”
He said that the ship had to disengage from its position in the Far North for three weeks in May to take supplies and that members of the team were interrupted by alternating voyage plans following the coronovirus ban, but this did not make the mission any worse. The problem did not happen.
Rex, an atmospheric scientist at Germany’s Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Ocean Research, said Rex, who carried out the expedition, brought back a cache of data with countless samples of snowflakes, ice and water.
More than 300 scientists from 20 countries, including the United States, Britain, France, Russia, and China, participated in a 150 million-euro ($ 177 million) campaign to measure conditions in one of the most remote and hostile parts. Planets during an entire year.
Much of the information will be used to improve scientists’ models of global warming, particularly in the Arctic, where change is occurring at a faster pace than anywhere else on the planet.
As part of the expedition, Polstern anchored the last part of a large float and set up a camp on the ice, protecting a small scientific village from wandering polar bears by alarms and scouts.
“We are above and beyond the data collection that we set out to do,” said Melinda Webster, sea ice specialist at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Webster, who led a team of 14 scientists during the fourth leg of the trip, said that it would take many years or decades in Jharkhand through the data.
“This is a very exciting time for change in Arctic science,” she said. We need to get all that help, because it is important to understand what is happening and help more and more people. its better. ”
Expedition leader Rex said the ship encountered unusually thin and ambiguous conditions in the area above North Greenland this summer, allowing them to make an unplanned detour to the North Pole.
“We’re seeing Arctic sea ice dying,” Rex said, adding that it’s possible that the Arctic may not have sea ice in summer anytime soon.
This will not only cause significant disruption to indigenous societies in the region, but will also interfere with the cooling system of the planet.
“We need to do everything to preserve it for future generations,” he said.

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