Scientists use Indian Ocean earthquake data to show how fast it is warming

Scientists use Indian Ocean earthquake data to show how fast it is warming

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Scientists have developed a new way to measure the speed of the Indian Ocean by analyzing the sound produced by earthquakes in the Indian Ocean. Relatively low cost techniques can be used for temperature monitoring.
According to researchers, 95 percent of the extra heat trapped on Earth by greenhouse gases is stored in the world’s oceans, which makes it important, including those at the California Institute of Technology (Celtic) in the United States. Monitor sea water temperature.
In a recent study published in the journal Science, scientists used existing seismic surveillance equipment, as well as historical data on earthquakes, to determine how much the sea temperature has changed. , And change continues, even in the depths of the outdoors, even with the penetration of traditional devices.
They estimated a 3,000-kilometer stretch of linear eastern Indian Ocean, and found temperature fluctuations between 2005 and 2016, which “significantly exceeded the final estimates.”
According to one estimate, scientists say the oceans could be 70 percent warmer than previously thought.
However, he warned against reaching an immediate conclusion, as more data needs to be collected and analyzed.
This method works by monitoring the sounds of earthquakes in question, which are powerful and travel long distances across the ocean without being significantly weakened, said J کالrn Calles, co-author of the study at Caltech.
The researchers explained that when an earthquake occurs under the sea, most of its energy passes through the earth, but some of this energy is transferred to the water as sound.
He said that these sound waves propagate from the epicenter of the earthquake like the waves of the earthquake that pass through the earth, but he added that this sound travels very fast.
The study said that the ground waves reach the first seismic monitoring station, followed by sound waves, which will appear as a secondary signal of the same event.
According to the researchers, the effect is similar to that of a thunderstorm, which is often seen in lightning moments before thunder.
Because the speed of sound in water increases with increasing water temperature, they found that when traveling a certain distance in the ocean, when a sound wave is heard, it is used to lower the water temperature. happens.
Scientists say that analyzing recurring earthquakes in the same place can provide more information about the rate of heat.
“In this example, we are looking at earthquakes from Sumatra in Indonesia, and when they reach the Central Indian Ocean, we measure them,” said Wenbo Wu, lead author of the study.
He added, “It takes them an hour and a half to cover this distance. The water temperature varies from one tenth to another. This is a very small partial change, but we can measure it.” ۔ ”
In the study, scientists used a seismometer that has been in the same place in the Central Indian Ocean since 2004.
He said it helps him look at the data he has collected every time there is an earthquake in Sumatra and at the same time determine the temperature of the ocean.
“We’re using small earthquakes that are very small and can’t cause any kind of damage or even humans,” Wu said.
“But seismometers can detect them from great distances, thus allowing us to monitor large-scale changes in ocean temperature on a particular route in a single measurement,” he added.
Based on the data analyzed so far, the researchers confirmed that the Indian Ocean is warming up, as indicated by other data collected by other methods.
But he added that the oceans may be faster than previously thought.
“The sea plays a key role in changing the climate,” Wu said.
“The oceans are the primary source of energy in the climate system, and deep-sea monitoring is especially important,” he added.
As underground earthquakes occur around the world, researchers say the system could be developed to monitor water temperatures in all oceans using existing infrastructure and equipment at relatively low cost. Goes

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