The ghost of electoral chaos questions the military role

The ghost of electoral chaos questions the military role

Washington: This is a question that the US President is not ready to consider in the election campaign: Can the post-poll, counting or post-poll response be so chaotic that the US military interferes?
The answer is yes, but only in an extreme case. There is no need for the army to play any role in elections. The Constitution puts the military in a narrow lane – defending the United States from outside enemies.
Civil orders are largely left to the civilian police. But there is an ambiguous law, the Insurance Act, which theoretically could turn an active-duty military into a police-like role. And governors have the ability to use the National Guard in emergency situations when needed.
The potential use of troops, either in active duty or by the National Guard, governors and military leaders has been discussed in elections or in post-election unrest.
President Donald Trump claimed without any evidence that mail-in balloting would create election fraud and suggested that he would not accept electoral losses. Deploying troops at polling stations on election day – even if only protecting citizens to vote – creates concern about voter concern.
Here are some questions and answers about possible military participation in the election: WILULDN’S MILITARY GET INVOLVED?
Civilian control of the military is a foundational principle of American democracy. This means that men and women are the same in response to civilian leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, and they abstain from politics. They owe allegiance to the Constitution and the laws of the country, not to any political party or president.
General Mark Milky, who is the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the nation’s top military officer, told Congress that the military is committed to remain politically and steering clear of any electoral role.
“In the event of a dispute over certain aspects of the election, the US courts and the US Congress need to resolve any dispute, not the US military,” he said in written answers to questions from two Democratic members of the House. Service committee. “I have no role for the US armed forces in this process.”
Miley said service members should not be involved in the transfer of power after the election. In other words, soldiers are not expected to intervene if there is a dispute that has won.
What is the National Guard?
The military is made up of active duty, National Guard and Reserve. In all but extreme cases, active-duty soldiers are used for warfare to protect the nation, not against American citizens on domestic soil. National Guard units are in every state and are controlled by the governor, not by the federal government.
Governors regularly mobilize their guard members for emergencies such as natural disasters, and can use them to help enforce the law during events such as riots. But law enforcement usually leads, and guard forces support it. During civil unrest this year, governors used guard troops to reduce violence and provide security. They could do it again.
To thwart that effort, the National Guard Bureau has designated military police units in two states to serve as quick-response forces so that a governor seeks help from other states to control the civil war.
In a national emergency, such as the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, a president may deploy guards in a federal position to support an active-duty military. The president has the authority to federalize guards for use in domestic emergencies, but there are questions about whether the state’s governor can try to block such a move.
What about the Insurance Act?
The president has authority under the Rebellion Act of 1807 to send active-duty troops to states that are unable to reduce an underutilization or defy federal law. Under the law, the president can activate troops without the approval of a governor until specific conditions are met, such as violence interfering with the execution of laws there.
Will the potential violence increase after the election? This may be open to debate. It is unclear whether states can legally prohibit any President’s use of the Insured Act.
In the last half-century, the president sent troops to the southern states to implement school diazation, in the 1950s and 1960s, without Gubernatorial consent. And soldiers were sent to Los Angeles when the California governor sought federal help during the 1992 riots. But this has not happened in relation to the presidential election in modern times.
In June, Trump considered implementing the Rebellion Act to use active-duty forces to spread unrest following the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. Secretary of Defense Mark Osho opposed using military troops for law enforcement. He argued publicly that the Insurance Act should be enforced “only in the most urgent and serious situations”, adding that “we are not in those situations.” Nevertheless, it would be unprecedented for military leaders to refuse to obey the president’s order.

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