Whale sightings aid exploration to protect wildlife in Indian Ocean ravines

Whale sightings aid exploration to protect wildlife in Indian Ocean ravines

ASCARENE PLATEAU: For more than two weeks at sea, scientists saw pilot whales and spinner dolphins, orcas and more, but not a single sperm whale had endangered the long-term waters of the Western Ocean.
Then, an underwater microphone picked up a series of unmistakable clicks and squeaks. A large pod of endangered whales was nearby. And at the sound of that, they were feeding.
Scientists have spent a month searching for whales and other marine mammals to live around the Mascarran Plateau to protect a remote 2,000-kilometer underwater ridge to fight climate change and protect marine wildlife Hoping to make an argument.
“We are actually generating the first baseline data for the region on marine megafuna, and that sounds quite exciting,” said biologist Kirsten Thompson of Exeter University, one of the scientists on Greenpeace’s research expedition.
For sperm whales, the largest of the toothed whale species, “the only data from this area comes from the days of whaling,” she said. The group of researchers hopes to draw attention to a UN campaign aimed at persuading countries to protect at least 30% of the planet’s land and ocean by 2030.
The plateau is partly a conservation target for the world’s largest sea meadow, caring for its Saya de Malha bank, which absorbs climate-heating carbon dioxide and provides a vast wildlife habitat. Whales, meanwhile, are also important to combat global warming. They release tons of iron a year into their feces, which feeds on CO2-absorbed phytoplankton.
Mascarin research is timely. The March 17 paper in the journal highlights the nature of marine areas with life as the goal of nature, and suggests that protecting these areas from fishing, shipping, deep-sea mining and other human intervention endangered marine species Will protect more than 80% of the residence.
According to the study, this would increase global fishing by more than 8 million tonnes. Most of the target areas are within the territorial waters of more than 100 countries around the world. But some things like Mascarin are in international waters.
Protecting the mascarren, which is larger than the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, will help preserve fisheries in East Africa 2,000 km (1,242 mi) away, another group of researchers argued in a 2019 study of the journal Marine Policy Given.
“These protected areas are a bit like savings accounts. It’s not just about protecting turtles and sequencing carbon,” said Douglas McCauley, a former fisherman who is now a marine biologist at the University of California Santa Barbara.
Sanctuaries stopped
Rising from the depths of the ocean, the Saya de Malha Shelf provides a unique shallow habitat in the midst of the high seas, hosting an estimated 3,900 marine species ranging from classless sperm whales to molluscs, macaulles, and 2020 studies The allies are meant to analyze the maritime policy.
“There is little information about the animals that live and feed here,” said marine biologist Tim Lewis, who conducted an acoustic survey on the Greenpeace voyage.
He said that finding sperm whales is equivalent to finding too much. “If there are sperm whales around, that means they are feeding on squid, and feeding on squid plankton.”
Creating a global network of marine sanctuaries is unlikely to be easy. For coastal waters, governments need to commit to and prioritize areas with abundant marine life – which are in favor of fishing interests.
Creating a successful conservation area at No-Man of the Open Sea, countries need to delegate some authority to a central body for their management, Christina Gagered, an advisor to the Natural Union for Conservation of Nature, involved in Huh. With negotiations on a planned treaty to protect international waters.
“Some of the big challenge is fishing states – will they try to bring the treaty down so much that it won’t have the same scope or ambition?” Gjerde, who did not name specific countries that could try to speed up those efforts.
The United Nations is working on broker deals to protect both international and regional waters. But the coronovirus epidemic has frustrated both sets of negotiations, and has twice delayed the UN Biodiversity Convention, now scheduled for October in Kunming, China.
The United Nations held an interim discussion on the high-sea treaty to better understand the delegates awaiting formal talks to resume in August.
Still worries about the loss of advocacy.
Liz Karan, director of the High Seas Conservation Project of the Pew Charitable Trust, said “some industry interests should also devote more time”.
But experts warn that ringfencing may not be sufficient in specific ocean areas for protection. Underwater species are being challenged by climate change to heat the water and make it more acidic, with some fish species already moving to new ranges to cope.
“I have a concern that we identify the areas we think are important today, and just draw a line around them, and then say: ‘Okay, everything is fine now”, St. Peter Said, Andrews in Scotland, a marine biologist at St University. Chances are, some species will go beyond that range.
Back on the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise, the crew is still scanning the vast ocean horizon through binoculars for evidence of life, while also taking a water sample for future DNA testing to determine if Which species are often plateaued.
Three days after the team arrived on the squid hunting for sperm whales, the coastline fell flat. The guards on the bridge broke the spray – a sperm whale plowing through the sun’s water. It raised its distinctive V-knotted tail skyward before disappearing back into the depths.

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