Yoshihide Suga: Japan’s new PM begins 1 full day, pledges to pursue reforms World News

Yoshihide Suga: Japan’s new PM begins 1 full day, pledges to pursue reforms World News

Tokyo: Japan’s new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga began its first day on Thursday with a resolve to pursue next year’s reforms.
“I am determined to work hard for people and achieve results so that we can live up to their expectations,” Suga told reporters.
Shuja was formally chosen on Wednesday to replace Shinzo Abe, who announced last month that he planned to step down due to ill health.
While Suga wins fellow ruling party lawmakers with a pledge to carry out Abe’s policies and work on Abe’s unfinished goals, he is also pushing for some policy changes of his own.
In his departure from Abe, Suga said he would shut down the Cherry Blossom viewing parties. Abe was accused of using taxpayers’ money at the annual gathering.
Suga told reporters on Thursday that there would no longer be any budget for such events. Sugga did not state that if the Cherry Blossom Party Fund was properly handled in the past, it planned to investigate.
He also promised to accelerate Japan’s digital transformation and appointed a special minister to promote digitization in education, healthcare and businesses. Suga has also campaigned to reduce cellphone fees, saying it will seek further cost reductions.
Analysts said that unlike Abe, which achieved grand goals such as constitutional amendments, Suga is ready to adopt a more populist approach to address the everyday concerns of the people.
“Mr. Suga’s goal is to achieve small success,” said political analyst Atsuo Ito on a TBS television talk show, “He will dig up things that many people think are not right and need to be changed.”
Some members of Suga’s cabinet said they would follow the example of their leader. Administrative Reforms Minister Taro Kono said he would immediately start a hotline to report people’s problems.
Abo’s government was criticized for appearing aloof and not listening to the citizens’ concerns.
Suga said his priorities were fighting coronoviruses and turning to an epidemic-ridden economy. He is also expected to continue Abe’s economic and diplomatic stance.
Born a farmer’s son as a self-made politician, Sugga opposed hereditary politics and factionalism within his party, and made systemic reforms one of his top policy goals.
He said that he would break bureaucratic barriers and end the vested interests standing in the way of reforms, while listening to the voice of the common people would fix the problems that did not serve their interests.
Shuga’s cabinet recorded a support rating of 64% in a Manichi newspaper poll released on Thursday, with Abe having 52% support at the beginning of his government in 2012.
Respondents cited Suga’s policies, as well as expectations for continuity and her personality for her support, apparently welcoming her reformist vows and background as a self-made politician from a rural peasant village, with Menichi said. The newspaper said that a telephone survey of 1,025 people 18 or older was done on Thursday. It did not provide a margin of error.

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